America’s response to the pandemic reflects that life is precious and that life is perishable. I appreciate President Trump for proclaiming Sunday as a National Day of Prayer. We definitely need to pray Sunday and every day.

May the pandemic encourage our nation to turn back to the God who created us and who has permitted us to arrive at this time in history. May we understand that it is foolish to seek solutions for our temporary body and not have a concern for our eternal soul. Let’s pray that every time we think or hear coronavirus that we will thank God for our bodies and pray that we will have wisdom to care for them properly.

May the virus also remind us to ask, where will my soul spend eternity? May we understand that our soul needs what John 3:16 offers.

A booklet from Billy Graham Association states that more than 65 million Americans, ages 12 and older, abuse or are addicted to alcohol or other drugs. More than 65 million Americans!

Do you realize that it takes the population of 28 of our least populated states to reach a total of 65 million? If America has a population of around 327 million, that means that one out of five of our population either abuses or is addicted to alcohol or other drugs. This is a major crisis – but unlabeled.

Certainly, the city can’t solve the problems of the world but you can make decisions that don’t make it worse for our community. When you promote events that involve intoxication, you are not blessing our community; you are damaging the greater area. Promoting or permitting intoxication does not reveal any concern for either our temporary bodies or our eternal souls.

I wish to pause and assure you that although I may only greet you with my elbow, I do respect and love each of you.

I see alcohol being promoted as though it is a blessing for our community, but the documented facts reveal it to be a curse. Alcohol has caused, and is causing, great tragedy. I have told some of you about my younger brother in another state; as he was driving home from church on a Sunday in broad daylight, he was hit by an intoxicated teenager. My brother died at the scene of the accident. He left a wife and three children. These tragedies are not uncommom.

You can’t solve the problems of the world but you can help our community by acknowledging what alcohol has done and is doing.

We clearly understand that for both the coronavirus and the alcohol-drug crisis we don’t want either to spread; we do need a solution for both.

A time of crisis can be a blessing if we stop and get our thinking straight. God created us and He died for us. Our time on earth is short. We will stand before Him and give account. There is joy in our soul when we live for Him.

A redemptive acronym for Corona: Christ Only, Repent Often, No Anxiety.

Virgil Ullom, D.D.S. is a resident of Babson Park. Guest columns are the opinion of the writer, not necessarily that of the Highlands News-Sun.